All Posts   Posted:   June 6, 2016 by Jennifer Williams

One of my earliest experiences in the plant world was during college when I worked at an independent garden center in Anchorage, AK – not only was this beautiful heated glass greenhouse a magical reprieve from the long Alaskan winters but there was a resident Staghorn Fern that forever endeared me to this species. ‘Harry’ was a magnificent specimen and at over 3 feet across and just as tall, he (somehow plants are all masculine in my mind) had a commanding presence over the entrance to the green house.

This is no ordinary fern; with two distinct types of fronds to help it thrive as an epiphyte (uses trees for support but gathers water and nutrients from the air) on tree trunks in tropical spots like Java and New Guinea. The basal fronds are thick and often heart or shield shaped in order to protect the roots and collect water, then out of the basal fronds are very different arching and forked fronds. Both types of fronds have a soft fuzzy texture that's irresistibly similar to antlers but this novel feature has a purpose – drought tolerance. I know it's counterintuitive to think of a fern as low water but that's just one more reason it's a perfect fit to mount on driftwood or any other piece of wood that suits your fancy. And although it is rare in the fern world, here's a few other varieties of drought tolerant ferns to try perched on top of wood: Asparagus Fern, Rabbit's Foot Fern and Kangaroo Fern!

Our creative crew has been hard at work mounting all sorts of ferns and even bromeliads and hoyas to adorn our houseplant department. We have a great selection of of these mounted ferns at our Portland garden center locations - stop by to get one or read on for DIY instructions on this trending garden project.

What you'll need to make your own mounted fern:

Supplies:

Fern or other easy care houseplant start 4” or 6”

Bonsai mix &  peat moss (we suggest Gardner & Bloom)

Sheet moss, collected or packaged

Scrap lumber or driftwood

Filament (fishing line)

Heavy gauge wire (optional for hanging)

Small copper nails or carpet nails (optional)

Drill with large drill bit (optional)

Hammer

DIY Steps:

1. If planning to hang the mounted fern, drill a hole first to loop heavy gauge wire through

2. Mix soil & moisten until it holds is shape when formed into a ball

3. Shake soil from the roots of the fern & encase them with new soil mix

4. Place in a natural nook of driftwood

5. Cover with moss

6.Wrap fishing line around it to secure

*If using flatter driftwood/bark or a wood slab follow the above instructions, then trace a circle where the fern will go and pound in nails half way every 1-2 inches around circle. Place fern with soil mix in the center, cover with moss, and then use the filament to hold it all in place by looping around exposed nail heads back and forth (creating a crisscross pattern).

Mounted Plant Care Tips: Super Easy smile

Hang your mounted plant or place in a location with bright, indirect light

Soak with water weekly or when dry & mist between waterings & enjoy!

One of my earliest experiences in the plant world was during college when I worked at an independent garden center in Anchorage, AK – not only was this beautiful heated glass greenhouse a magical reprieve from the long Alaskan winters but there was a resident Staghorn Fern that forever endeared me to this species. ‘Harry’ was a magnificent specimen and at over 3 feet across and just as tall, he (somehow plants are all masculine in my mind) had a commanding presence over the entrance to the green house.

This is no ordinary fern; with two distinct types of fronds to help it thrive as an epiphyte (uses trees for support but gathers water and nutrients from the air) on tree trunks in tropical spots like Java and New Guinea. The basal fronds are thick and often heart or shield shaped in order to protect the roots and collect water, then out of the basal fronds are very different arching and forked fronds. Both types of fronds have a soft fuzzy texture that's irresistibly similar to antlers but this novel feature has a purpose – drought tolerance. I know it's counterintuitive to think of a fern as low water but that's just one more reason it's a perfect fit to mount on driftwood or any other piece of wood that suits your fancy. And although it is rare in the fern world, here's a few other varieties of drought tolerant ferns to try perched on top of wood: Asparagus Fern, Rabbit's Foot Fern and Kangaroo Fern!

Our creative crew has been hard at work mounting all sorts of ferns and even bromeliads and hoyas to adorn our houseplant department. We have a great selection of of these mounted ferns at our Portland garden center locations - stop by to get one or read on for DIY instructions on this trending garden project.

What you'll need to make your own mounted fern:

Supplies:

Fern or other easy care houseplant start 4” or 6”

Bonsai mix &  peat moss (we suggest Gardner & Bloom)

Sheet moss, collected or packaged

Scrap lumber or driftwood

Filament (fishing line)

Heavy gauge wire (optional for hanging)

Small copper nails or carpet nails (optional)

Drill with large drill bit (optional)

Hammer

DIY Steps:

1. If planning to hang the mounted fern, drill a hole first to loop heavy gauge wire through

2. Mix soil & moisten until it holds is shape when formed into a ball

3. Shake soil from the roots of the fern & encase them with new soil mix

4. Place in a natural nook of driftwood

5. Cover with moss

6.Wrap fishing line around it to secure

*If using flatter driftwood/bark or a wood slab follow the above instructions, then trace a circle where the fern will go and pound in nails half way every 1-2 inches around circle. Place fern with soil mix in the center, cover with moss, and then use the filament to hold it all in place by looping around exposed nail heads back and forth (creating a crisscross pattern).

Mounted Plant Care Tips: Super Easy smile

Hang your mounted plant or place in a location with bright, indirect light

Soak with water weekly or when dry & mist between waterings & enjoy!